4 Sales examples that will not annoy prospects

Are You a Sales Coach? These are 4 examples that could work

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Do you remember the knots in your stomach as you asked “special someone” to prom. When you approach a prospect to become a sales representative, your clammy palms may come back. The stakes are the same.


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It can be overwhelming because even the most skilled reps need eight touches to pull the trigger on their sales pitch. It may be comforting to know that some pre-planning can help you manage these difficult emotions and make your interactions more smooth. Maintaining a consistent sales style that works for your customers is the key.


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What is sales cadence? How can you use it to reach your sales goals? Let’s take an in-depth look.

What is Sales Cadence?

Cadence is traditionally a term that refers to a rhythm or tempo.

Sales cadence, on the other hand, is about creating repeatable and regular activities. These activities will help increase contacts and qualify prospects. This is a way to create a road map to sales success.

It is the beat that your sales team dances to – it’s an art and science that requires an understanding and application of human psychology to achieve conversions.


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Outbound sales cadence can be either inbound or inbound. Inbound cadence is when you reach out to a prospect that knows something about your company. Outbound cadence, on the other hand, is when a salesperson contacts someone who doesn’t know anything about your company.

Despite the broad definition, sales cadence is crucial to success.

What is a foolproof sales strategy? Let’s see.

Success in Sales: The Elements

Sales cadence could be described as the number and quality of contacts per lead. This would be very simplistic. Sales cadence, however, is more complex than a lasagna. It has many elements.


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A successful sales strategy must include the following:

Ttempts

The number of contacts or leads that have been touched by an attempt is called the attempted count.


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InsideSales.com surveyed 1000 companies and found that 15.4 calls were made. This can be broken down to 4.7 calls, 2.9% voicemails, 2.6 emails, 1.8 social touch, 0.8 mailers and 0.7 SMS messages. The total number of attempted contacts remained at 3 to 4.

Some salespeople may swear by the magic number between eight and ten, but this is purely an arbitrary choice. It is about testing and trying to find what works best for you.

Media

The next step is to consider the various media formats that can be used to attract leads or prospects. Phone calls, text messaging and voicemails are the most common channels for prospecting.

A variety of outreach channels will usually generate better responses than sticking with one-mode. A single communication channel has a success rate of 9.5%, while three can increase it to 25.1%. This is incredible, I know.

To maintain a competitive edge, you need to be creative in your campaigns. Videos and social media have gained popularity recently because they offer a number of benefits.

Time


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The time between the first contact (or the last attempt) is called the duration. For best results, it is recommended that you keep the duration between contact and last attempt at least 6-8 days. Any longer than that will limit your ability to comply with the law of diminishing return and render your efforts ineffective.

Spacing


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Spacing refers to the time between activities. This is your perception of the frequency to follow, so you don’t bother prospects or scare away. It is best to allow 2 days for the optimal spacing. This allows you to fine tune the dial between “forgettable”, and “annoying”.

Content


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The content is the message you use in your sales conversation. Content is what you use to contact your prospect or educate them. Your email, video, voicemails, and text messages could all be key to hooking your prospects.

For a lasting impression, keep your prospecting emails to 300 words and voice messages to 30 seconds. Videos should be 60-90 seconds long.

Buyers are now taking control of the sales process. This is the beginning of Buyer’s Persona. Buyer’s Persona encourages companies research their target audience to personalize the customer experience and journey through techniques such as segmentation.


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Once you have a good understanding of sales cadence in general, let’s take a look at some practical examples of sales cadence that you can use.

Sales Cadence Example 1 – The Email-Call Voicemail Trinity

You may need to have a long sales process (such as SaaS, consulting or insurance). This sales process will meet your needs. It spans 77 days and includes approximately 25 touchpoints.

Structure

This is the structure of the sales cadence:

Day 1: Email 1Day2: Call 1, Voicemail 1, Email 2Day7: Call 2, Voicemail 1, Email 3Day 21: Call 4, Voicemail 3, Email 4Day21: Call 4, Voicemail 3, Email 4Day21: Call 4, Voicemail 3, Email 4Day21: Call 4, Voicemail 3, Email 5Day35: Call 5, Voicemail 5, Email 6Day 49 Call 6, Voicemail 6, Email 7Day63 Call 7, Voicemail 7, Email 8Day77 Call 8, Voicemail 8, Email 9


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Pros

It starts with a cold email outreach and then a call on the second day.

Cons

A lack of social media components can be a problem, considering the modern requirements.

Example 2 of Sales Cadence: The Email Call Voicemail Social Media Quadruple

This sales cadence is best suited for quick-paced action, where urgency is the driving force.

Structure

This is the structure of the sales cadence:

Day 1: Emails 1 & 2Day 3: Call 1, Voice Mail 1Day4: Social Media 1, Email 4Day5: Call 2, Email 5, Social Media 2Day 4: Email 1, Voice Mail 1Day 5: Call 2, Email 4, Social Media 1Day 6: Email 1, Voice Mail 1Day 7: Email 1, Voice Mail 1Day 8: Email 3, Email 3Day 9: Email 1Day 10: Email 1Day 11: Email 1Day 3: Email 1Day 2: Email 3Day 2: Email 3Day 4: Email 1, Voice Mail 3Day 1Day 1Day 1 and 2Day 3Day 1Day 3Day 3Day 3Day 3Day 3Day 1Day 3Day 1Day 2Day 2Day 2

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Pros

It uses three main channels to reach prospects: email, phone and social media.

Cons

Prospects can feel overwhelmed by the flurry and rapid pace of activity within a short time. You must wait until the third day after the mail was opened to schedule a call. For transactional businesses, 10 touchpoints is too few.

Sales Cadence Example 3 – The Email-Phone Alternative

The 22-day sales cycle alternates between phone calls and emails to provide consistent, tested results. It involves 13 touchpoints, mostly in the form email and phone calls.

Structure

This is the structure of this sales cadence:

Day 1: EmailDay 3, PhoneDay 4, EmailDay 10, PhoneDay 7, EmailDay 10, PhoneDay 12, EmailDay 14, PhoneDay 16, EmailDay 19, PhoneDay 21, Phone and EmailDay 22, Nurture or Repeat

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Pros

This three-week period can strike the perfect balance between keeping your prospect informed and allowing them to breathe.

Cons

It only uses one channel per day, and that is phones and email.

Example 4 of Sales Cadence: The Omnichannel Approach

One of the major problems with the examples of sales cadence is their reliance on only two or three channels. This sales cadence example uses a variety of channels to reach prospects and gently guide them through the sales funnel.

Structure

This is the structure of this sales cadence:

Day 1: Prospect research via social media and digital trail.Day 3: InMail message to introduce yourself and your company.Day 4: Follow up email to request information.Day 6: Telephone to establish a connection.Day 7: Share articles with prospects and tag them on useful social media posts. Day 8: Emails with video attachments. Day 10: Book an appointment. Day 10: Call to book an appointment. Day 11: Email or phone to get the details.

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Pros

It takes between 12 and 22 days to complete the campaign, which is perfect for maintaining high engagement.

Cons

To incorporate personalization elements, it takes careful planning and research. You will need to rely on digital tools like a CRM to ensure that outreach is scalable.

FAQs

Q.1. Q.1. It eliminates guesswork and provides a tried-and-trued approach. It is consistent regardless of sales rep. Assists leads in moving through the various stages of the sales funnel. Summary: Source
Q.2. Q.2. Clicking on the embedded link in an email indicates that they have taken action. Email open to reply ratio. If emails receive responses, that means your content is resonating with your audience. Ratio of call to appointments: This tells you if your target audience is the right one. Bounce rate is an indicator of the quality of your mailing list. Bounce rates can be reduced by maintaining the hygiene of your mailing lists.
Q.3 What are the secrets to improving your sales cadence? Source Here’s the real deal. Depending on your industry, here’s what to do. Find the best times to call or email your prospect. Keep your persistence up, but don’t get too attached. Use the right content to target your audience. Ensure quality and quantity when you are doing outreach. You can test and improve your sales process and adjust as necessary. Be proactive and seek the consent of your prospect.

Conclusion

The omnichannel sales cadence is the most applicable to the current scenario. It has high engagement rates and is available at all touchpoints to make it meaningful. You can use the information and tips above to create a sales strategy that works for you. Based on the pros and cons of each example, you can decide what works. To be successful, you must understand your industry, sales process, and technology stack.

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